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Google charge law enforcement and government agency fees for access to user data

Google charge law enforcement and government agency fees for access to user data
Google charge law enforcement and government agency fees for access to user data

According to a New York Times report, Google has begun to charge law enforcement agencies for access to user data. The company charges $ 45 for a subpoena, $ 60 for wiretapping, and $ 245 for a search warrant.

The company received many requests from law enforcement agencies to provide data to its users, and therefore decided to charge fees for collecting such data. According to the report, Google is legally permitted to charge these fees, but traditionally large technology companies transfer data for free.

On the one hand, it looks like Google can use bad taste to look for police. On the other hand, proponents of data protection are welcomed with incentives for law enforcement agencies conducting extensive research.

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In a transparency report on consumer information questions, Google has surveyed more than 160,000 users or accounts in the past ten years. In 60 to 80% of cases, Google has sent at least a few data requests over the years. “We review every request we receive to ensure that it meets the requirements and applicable Google legal guidelines,” the Google report said. “If we believe that the request is too comprehensive – we want too much information in the circumstances – we will try to limit it.”

Google also said that, in connection with legal requests from US government agencies, “the search warrant follows the most common summons so far.” This tells the user whose data is requested if possible, e.g. When Google accepts the ECPA legal process for user accounts, it is our policy to notify users via email before disclosing information, unless such notice is prohibited by law. “

Because Google makes money (albeit modest) from sending user data to governments and law enforcement agencies, there is far more alarming data protection news this week. According to a report by the Israeli company Cellebrite, which hacked phones on behalf of the US government, telephone hacking technology appears to be widely used by US law enforcement agencies. Source